Design Event 2010

Yesterday, my sister, my creative partner, my boyfriend and I went on a Design Event trip in Newcastle. It was one of the most eventful, beneficial and fun days I have had in such a long time.

After lunch, we went to Newcastle Art Centre. First, we walked through the “Exquisite Corpse”. I really liked many of the works there. The works were separated into different labeled sections. One that I can recall right away is called “It’s poison whatever you call it” (or something along that line) and two of the pieces under that category is of McDonalds.

They also offered an activity for visitors to participate in. I don’t remember the name of the game but I think most of us have played it when we were kids.

Then we went upstairs for “Time and Place, Hither and Thither, War and Peace”. Personally, I felt that this one is darker and more wicked than the “Exquisite Corpse”. I spent more time looking at each of the work, and more thoughts went through my head, instead of just a chuckle.

They had an activity for visitors up here as well. We were encouraged to draw something on the provided paper plates in response to the artworks. This is me with my masterpiece.

Then we left the Newcastle Art Centre.

Then we found out that next door also had an exhibition so we went inside. I’m not sure what the name of the exhibition was. We walked around but I wasn’t quite impressed with this one. Most of the work was very basic pencil work of still life peppered with some tiny idea. I think the arrangement was more impressive than the artwork itself.

After that, we moved on to the Electrik Sheep for “Droodlings an exhibition by Craww”. The store Electrik Sheep itself was really cool. They didn’t just simply offer clothes, they had a bicycle, an eagle and design books as decoration as well. I had some time to sneak through a book of a collection of lomo photographs and wished I was rich enough to collect books like that. The exhibition was nice. It had style and was very emotive.

This was right outside Electrik Sheep. I’m pretty sure it’s a part of the exhibition.

Then we stopped for an early dinner at an American café called Stateside, where my creative partner was, at one point, served raw meat for his medium steak. (I’m not going into the details here because it’ll take up too much space.)

Here’s my creative partner with his bloody hand from the raw meat.

After the dinner, we walked across the city to Northern Stage for “Northernness: Set of Drawers”. The place looks very cool and it gives out a certain mood that I can’t pinpoint but it feels very homey. The work is based on the theme “Northernness” and all the artists have a special relationship with the North. I can really relate to some of the work, since I’ve been living in Newcastle for a year now. Moreover, my boyfriend is Norwegian and one of the artists included Scandinavia into her definition of “Northernness”. I noticed that the various frames the artists used really worked with and supported the artworks. (One was simple paper clips.) I also liked how the name of the Northern Stage ties in with the theme of the exhibition. However, there was this one artist that I didn’t personally like. Her work was mainly collage and I just felt that any kid could do that, and the idea wasn’t that original either.

This one made me laugh out loud.

Overall, it was a very interesting and fun day. The exhibitions we visited this time were much better than those we visited two weeks ago. I was so disappointed in those places that I didn’t even blog about them. I mean, one was a small white room with two wooden poles in two opposite corners. And they talked about it like it was supposed to mean so much.

I think this is an issue in Arts nowadays. Anything can be called abstract art. I’m just not impressed. They can call me unartistic or whatever, I call them frauds.

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The Sun 4.0 advert

This is the kind of ad that brightens up my day.

Newspapers nowadays are moving online and people are consuming news online more and more. This costs newspapers a lot of money and they’re discussing it everywhere on the Internet.

This advert just takes that and turns it around and uses it.

It’s clever.

Jamie Oliver’s TED Talk

I just watched this video and was moved by the whole speech. I mean, I have never seen anyone on TED Talk getting a standing ovation before. I think it’s pretty significant.

This video also makes me think about how powerful the media is nowadays. And this is an example of how to take advantage of it. Positively.

See the part that he talked about his wish and the magic wand. What he didn’t realize was that, he’s not just presenting his idea to the smart people in the room, but also others around the world. (Especially when the website offers subtitles in 37 other languages.)

Placement module

Yesterday, during the afternoon class we were assigned a new module.

For this new module, which is going to last throughout the year, we have to get a placement and work for 120 hours.

I’m kind of excited and frightened at the same time about this new module.

I think it’s good because it’s going to force us to get out there and get ourselves a placement, which is going to be very useful in the future.

I have been thinking about getting a placement for a while now, but I’ve either been lazy or too scared to actually start doing it. Now I have no excuse.

Dunwoody Job Institute radio commercials

I was just listening to a list of radio spots for Dunwoody Job Institute:

http://www.heywhipple.com/my-favorite-radio-campaign/

All were written by the famous Luke Sullivan, author of Hey Whipple, Squeeze This.

Personally, I think radio advertising requires more wittiness than other media, because it’s so easy to lose your audience when you only have sound to capture their attention. It’s all in the copy. No flashy images, no beautiful art direction, no good-looking models.

I’m scared of the day that I’ll have to write one myself.

Until then, I’ll be enjoying others’ success.

First session on Illustrator

Yesterday we had our first IT session on Illustrator.

The tutor talked us through the whole program roughly. Basically, we learned the function of each tool on the toolbar.

We learned the the difference between the Select Tool and Direct Select Tool; how the first tool is for big changes and the latter is for small/direct changes.

The tutor said that the Pen Tool is one of the most important tools in Illustrator. And it is better to use the Pen Tool than the Paintbrush Tool.

The Type Tool in Illustrator is apparently better than in Photoshop. No matter how much you zoom in, it will never be pixelated. You can also do many things with the Type Tool.

Additionally, the colors will always look better using Illustrator than using Photoshop.

We also learned about the Blend Tool and I think it’s pretty cool.

We also learned some shortcuts, which I think will be very useful.

We learned how significant Layers are in Illustrator. In Photoshop, the more layers you have, the slower the program gets. But it’s basically the opposite for Illustrator. It makes it easier for you to work. And you have to always label the layers, in order to not get confused later on. And when you’re not using any layer, just lock it, so you don’t accidentally work on the wrong layer.

Pathfinder is also a very interesting and useful tool I learned.

At the end of the session, this is what I got.

I feel pretty cool.